• Users Online: 328
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1000

Multiple inert fiberglass corneal foreign bodies in a pediatric patient


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, USA
3 Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS); Department of Ophthalmology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Date of Web Publication11-Oct-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Heather V Broyles
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_2574_21

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Broyles HV, Fong JW, Lowery RS. Multiple inert fiberglass corneal foreign bodies in a pediatric patient. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022;2:1000

How to cite this URL:
Broyles HV, Fong JW, Lowery RS. Multiple inert fiberglass corneal foreign bodies in a pediatric patient. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Nov 30];2:1000. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2022/2/4/1000/358166



An 8-year-old male presented with tearing 3 days after his fishing pole snapped, propelling multiple foreign bodies into his left cornea. Distance visual acuity was 20/20 in each eye. Examination revealed multiple Seidel-negative fiberglass foreign bodies in the corneal stroma without evidence of inflammation or infection. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography showed multiple foreign bodies embedded in the stroma with an optical shadow projecting into the anterior chamber and overlying healed epithelium [Figure 1]. It was explained to the family that residual corneal scarring is possible regardless of removal due to penetration deep into Bowman's layer.[1] However, the patient is at lower risk for amblyopia at this age. The family elected observation. Two months later, vision remained 20/20 without significant refractive error. This is consistent with a previous report of observation of an intraocular foreign body composed of inert material due to lack of inflammation.[2]
Figure 1: Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT, left and right) reveals foreign bodies penetrating partial-thickness through the cornea, with healed epithelium overlying them at the surface (arrows). Anterior segment photograph was obtained using an expired 20-diopter intraocular lens (IOL) placed over a smartphone camera lens

Click here to view


Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
American Academy of Ophthalmology. Section 8: External disease and cornea: Basic and clinical science course, 2020-2021. 14:399-401.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Mostafavi D, Olumba K, Shrier EM. Fiberglass intraocular foreign body with no initial ocular symptoms. Retin Cases Brief Rep 2014;8:10-2.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed193    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded26    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]