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 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 861

Spiderman–Spiderman


Department of Ophthalmology, Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri Government Medical College and Hospital, Nerchowk, Distt. Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication16-Jul-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anubhav Chauhan
Department of Ophthalmology, Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri Government Medical College and Hospital, Nerchowk, Distt. Mandi, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_366_22

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How to cite this article:
Chauhan A, Sharma DK. Spiderman–Spiderman. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022;2:861

How to cite this URL:
Chauhan A, Sharma DK. Spiderman–Spiderman. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Aug 14];2:861. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2022/2/3/861/351183



A 20-year-old male came to our OPD for routine eye checkup. His best-corrected visual aquity was 6/12 in the right eyes and 6/6 in the left eye. Examination of both the eyes revealed thick and dense iris tissue strands obscuring the visual axis and extending from the iris to the anterior surface of the lens resembling a spiderweb, along with iris pigment on the anterior lens capsule [Figure 1]. A Nd Yag laser pupillotomy or a surgical option to clear the visual axis was given to the patient, but he refused. Persistent pupillary membrane (PPM) is a congenital ocular anomaly in which fine iris strands are seen along the pupil.[1] Type 2 PPM has iridolenticular adhesion.[2] Extensive PPM, occluding the visual axis, is a rare entity.[3] Surgery, mydriasis, and yag laser therapy are treatment modalities.[4] An important differential diagnosis is accessory iris membrane (AIM). AIM presents a virtual second pseudopupil aperture in the center, while PPM has no pseudopupil.[5]
Figure 1: PPM in bilateral eyes resembling a spiderweb

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Trattler WB, Keiser P, Friedman NJ. Review of Ophthalmology. 2nd ed. Elsevier Inc.; 2012. p. 105-278.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Duke-Elder S. System of Ophthalmology. Vol. 3. 1st ed. London: Henry Kimpton; 1964. p. 775.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Banigallapati S, Potti S, Marthala H. A rare case of persistent pupillary membrane: Case-based approach and management. Indian J Ophthalmol 2018;66:1480-3.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
4.
Thacker NM, Brit MT, Demer JL. Extensive persistent pupillary membranes: Conservative management. J AAPOS 2005;9:495-6.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Gavriş M, Horge I, Avram E, Belicioiu R, Olteanu IA, Kedves H. Persistent pupillary membrane or accessory Iris membrane? Rom J Ophthalmol 2015;59:184-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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