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 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 854

Combined primary and secondary calcification of intra-ocular lenses


1 Department of Ophthalmology, B W Lions Superspeciality Eye Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Consultant, Kaveri Eye Hospital, Mandya, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Vitreo-Retina, B W Lions Superspeciality Eye Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication16-Jul-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. C K Nagesha
Department of Vitreo-Retina, B W Lions Superspeciality Eye Hospital, Bengaluru - 560 002, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_582_22

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How to cite this article:
Ramadevi K S, Shruthi M N, Nagesha C K. Combined primary and secondary calcification of intra-ocular lenses. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022;2:854

How to cite this URL:
Ramadevi K S, Shruthi M N, Nagesha C K. Combined primary and secondary calcification of intra-ocular lenses. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Aug 11];2:854. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2022/2/3/854/351203



A 68-year-old elderly was evaluated for gradual diminution of vision in the right eye. Four years ago, he had undergone uneventful cataract surgery in the same eye. Examination revealed 3/60 vision and an opacified intra-ocular lens (IOL) in the bag [Figure 1]a. Vision improved to 6/6 after IOL exchange surgery. The IOL had primary calcification of the lens substance [Figure 1]b along with secondary granular calcium deposits on the surface [Figure 1]c and [Figure 1]d.
Figure 1: Opacified IOL in the right eye (a), homogeneous milky white opacification of both haptics and optics (b), Alizarian Red stain highlighting surface calcium deposits (c), and microscopic magnified view (d)

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Opacification of IOLs is not uncommon, causing a drop in vision post-cataract surgery. Micro-vacules on the hydrophobic optics (glistening) and snowflake deposits are visually non-threatening.[1] However, primary calcification of the lens substance in the hydrophilic lens severely impairs vision. The secondary deposits of calcium usually occur in uveitic and diabetic eyes, causing a varying degree of visual impairment.[2] Combined primary and secondary calcification is a severe form as is in this case and warrants explantation.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Kanclerz P, Yildirim TM, Khoramnia R. Microscopic characteristics of late intraocular lens opacifications. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2021;145:759-67.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Neuhann IM, Werner L, Izak AM, Pandey SK, Kleinmann G, Mamalis N, et al. Late postoperative opacification of a hydrophilic acrylic (hydrogel) intraocular lens: A clinicopathological analysis of 106 explants. Ophthalmology 2004;111:2094-101.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


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