• Users Online: 368
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 845

Post-traumatic lens neovascularization


Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar, Punjab, India

Date of Web Publication16-Jul-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Pawan Prasher
Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Vallah, Amritsar - 143 501, Punjab
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_45_22

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Prasher P, Sandhu RK. Post-traumatic lens neovascularization. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022;2:845

How to cite this URL:
Prasher P, Sandhu RK. Post-traumatic lens neovascularization. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Aug 19];2:845. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2022/2/3/845/351192



A 26-year-old male presented with whiteness and no perception of light in his right eye one year after sustaining blunt trauma. Slit-lamp examination revealed a fixed, dilated pupil and fronds of blood vessels encroaching radially from angle onto anterior capsule of a yellowish white cataractous lens [Figure 1]. He was advised rehabilitation with a cosmetic contact lens.
Figure 1: Slit-lamp examination revealed a fixed, dilated pupil and fronds of blood vessels encroaching radially from angle onto anterior capsule of a yellowish white cataractous lens

Click here to view


Human crystalline lens is an avascular structure with an anti-angiogenesis mechanism which inhibits neovascularization.[1] Intraocular inflammation and trauma to lens capsule, however, rarely result in obliteration of angle and induce hypoxia of lens leading to ingrowth of fibrovascular membrane over lens capsule.[1],[2],[3] Other causes of lens neovascularization reported in literature include proliferative diabetes retinopathy, retinal detachment, argon laser trabeculoplasty, and idiopathic.[4],[5]

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Hwang YS, Lai CC, Lee JS, Yang KJ, Chen TL. Posttraumatic neovascularization in a cataractous crystalline lens. J Cataract Refract Surg 2002;28:715-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Kabat AG. Lenticular neovascularization subsequent to traumatic cataract formation. Optom Vis Sci 2011;88:1127-32.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Gupta S, Gogia V, Ramya A, Sihota R. Capsular neovascularisation: Case report and review of literature. Eye (Lond) 2014;28:358-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Roy R, Saurabh K, Srivastava P, Pal SS, Nandi K, Kochgaway L, et al. The red lens: A case of florid lens neovascularisation. Clin Exp Optom 2020;103:706-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Soman M, Nair IJ, Nadig RR, Sheth JU, Nair U. Idiopathic lenticular surface neovascularization: An unusual presentation. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2021;24:101231. doi: 10.1016/j.ajoc. 2021.101231.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed115    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded11    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]