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 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 612

Retained intracorneal and intracameral eyelashes following blunt trauma


1 Department of Ophthalmic Biophysics, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
2 Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
3 Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India

Date of Web Publication13-Apr-2022

Correspondence Address:
Sunita Chaurasia
Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, The Cornea Institute, L V Prasad Eye Institute, L V Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad - 500 034, Telangana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1958_21

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How to cite this article:
Natarajan R, Mishra DK, Rao P, Chaurasia S. Retained intracorneal and intracameral eyelashes following blunt trauma. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022;2:612

How to cite this URL:
Natarajan R, Mishra DK, Rao P, Chaurasia S. Retained intracorneal and intracameral eyelashes following blunt trauma. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 May 26];2:612. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2022/2/2/612/342914



A 12-year-old boy presented with a self-sealed corneal tear with two eyelashes embedded within the stroma and communicating with the anterior chamber reaching up to the angles at 2'o clock following an injury with a stone [Figure 1]. The surgical removal of intraocular cilia was performed. Intraocular cilia may present in conjunctiva, cornea, anterior chamber, lens, iris, ciliary body, and retina.[1] If not removed, it may cause a granulomatous reaction, cyst formation in the anterior chamber, and structural changes such as fragmentation, depigmentation, and gradual absorption.[2],[3] Whenever possible, surgical extraction of the retained intraocular cilia should be performed.
Figure 1: (a) Slit-lamp images of the left eye shows the sealed corneal tear with cilium within the cornea and (b) communication with the anterior chamber (pointed with arrows)

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Raman M, Anuradha A, Vasumathi K, Sheela S, Subbiah GN. Intraocular cilia–A rare case report. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res 2018;56:266-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Metrikin DC, Fante RG, Hodes BL. Intraocular cilia after penetrating eye injury. Arch Ophthalmol 1992;110:921.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Fish LA, Ragen MT, Smith RE, Lean J. Propionibacterium acnes lens abscess after traumatic implantation of intralenticular cilia. Am J Ophthalmol 1988;105:423-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


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