• Users Online: 207
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
PHOTO ESSAY
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 267-268

Posterior polar cataract with an occult posterior capsular rent: A rare catch


Department of Ophthalmology, Choithram Netralaya, Indore, Madhay Pradesh, India

Date of Submission09-Apr-2021
Date of Acceptance20-Jul-2021
Date of Web Publication07-Jan-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Dhaivat Shah
Choithram Netralaya, Dhar Road, Indore - 453 112, Madhay Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_804_21

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 


Keywords: Daljit Singh sign, posterior capsular rent, posterior polar cataract


How to cite this article:
Damani T, Shah D, Punamia R, Gokharu S. Posterior polar cataract with an occult posterior capsular rent: A rare catch. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2022;2:267-8

How to cite this URL:
Damani T, Shah D, Punamia R, Gokharu S. Posterior polar cataract with an occult posterior capsular rent: A rare catch. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Jan 23];2:267-8. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2022/2/1/267/334980



Posterior polar cataract (PPC) remains a challenge for cataract surgeons because of its high association with complications such as posterior capsular rent and nucleus drop. PPC is associated with either a thin and fragile posterior capsule with the discoid opacity being adherent to it, or in up to 20% of cases, posterior capsule may be congenitally deficient.[1],[2]

We hereby document a photo essay of a patient with posterior polar cataract with tell-tale signs of defective posterior capsule, which corresponds to type 3 variant of Daljit Singh's classification of PPC.[3]

A 50-year-old healthy male presented with diminution of vision in both eyes since 1 year. Slit-lamp examination of both eyes showed distinctive discoid lens opacity situated at posterior pole of lens with concentric thickened rings around the central plaque opacity (bull's eye or onion peel appearance); dense white spots were also seen at the edge of the opacity (Daljit Singh sign) [Figure 1]a. Right eye also showed an elongated posterior capsule defect adjoining the central opacity which became prominent on pupillary retro illumination [Figure 1]b. The posterior segment shows yellowish shadow of the PPC embarking on the macula [Figure 2].
Figure 1: (a) Slit-lamp photograph of right eye showing discoid opacity with onion peel appearance, dense white spots at the edge of opacity (Daljit Singh sign) (yellow arrows); (b) showing an elongated posterior capsule defect adjoining the central opacity which became prominent on pupillary retro illumination (red arrows)

Click here to view
Figure 2: Fundus photo of right eye showing a yellowish shadow of the posterior polar cataract over the maculabe

Click here to view



  Discussion Top


The right eye PPC is a typical example of type 3 of Daljit Singh's classification of PPC where round or oval white opacity on posterior capsule has dense white spots (Daljit Singh sign) at the edge and is often associated with thin or absent posterior capsule.[3] Singh also observed that there is a possibility of conversion of type 2 (posterior polar opacity with ringed appearance) to type 3 over a period of time. We managed this case with phacoemulsification with a 5 mm capsulorhexis placing a 3-piece IOL in the sulcus, ensuring that the anterior hyaloid face was not disturbed.[4],[5]

Our report highlights a rare case of PPC and the importance of judicious preoperative assessment so that surgery can be planned by anticipating the complications and thereby minimizing the impact of complications.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Hejtmancik JF, Datilles M. Congenital and inherited cataracts. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, editors. Duane's Clinical Ophthalmology. CD ROM ed, vol 1, Chapter 74. Baltimore, Md.: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 2001.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Osher RH, Yu BC, Koch DD. Posterior polar cataracts: A predisposition to intraoperative posterior capsular rupture. J Cataract Refract Surg 1990;16:157-62.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Masket S. Consultation section: Cataract surgical problem. J Cataract Refract Surg 1997;23:819-24.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Ho SF, Ahmed S, Zaman AG. Spontaneous dislocation of posterior polar cataract. J Cataract Refract Surg 2007;33:1471-3.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Ashraf H, Khalili MR, Salouti R. Bilateral spontaneous rupture of posterior capsule in posterior polar cataract. Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2008;36:798-800.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
Abstract
Discussion
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed88    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded13    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]