• Users Online: 319
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
PHOTO ESSAY
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 798-799

Souvenir band in the corneoscleral limbus


1 Department of Retina and Vitreous, Aravind Eye Hospital, Tirunelveli, Tamilnadu, India
2 Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital, Tirunelveli, Tamilnadu, India

Date of Submission03-Oct-2020
Date of Acceptance25-Mar-2021
Date of Web Publication09-Oct-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Syed S Adeel
Aravind Eye Hospital, Tirunelveli - 627 001, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_3127_20

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 


Keywords: Anterior migration, corneoscleral limbus, retinal detachment, silicone band


How to cite this article:
Adeel SS, Mohideen SK, Shah VJ, Nair S, Talari S. Souvenir band in the corneoscleral limbus. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2021;1:798-9

How to cite this URL:
Adeel SS, Mohideen SK, Shah VJ, Nair S, Talari S. Souvenir band in the corneoscleral limbus. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Oct 28];1:798-9. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2021/1/4/798/327660



An 18-year-old male underwent cataract surgery with 240 solid silicone band encirclage anchored to the sclera in four quadrants under the muscles with 5-0 nonabsorbable braided polyester suture, three-port pars plana vitrectomy, and silicone oil injection for traumatic cataract and total retinal detachment in his right eye following closed globe injury. One year later on slit-lamp examination, the eye was quiet with anterior migration of the silicone band seen subconjunctivally and positioned in the cornea and at the limbus from 1 O'clock to 4 O'clock [Figure 1] with no restrictions in his extraocular movements. Its intrastromal location at the corneoscleral limbus was confirmed on anterior segment optical coherence tomography [Figure 2]. Retina appeared well attached under oil with traumatic optic atrophy. Cornea being clear and intraocular pressure being normal and with no diplopia, we preferred not to remove the band.
Figure 1: Anterior segment slit-lamp image of right eye showing anterior migration of silicone band and positioning itself in cornea and corneoscleral limbus. Arrow heads indicate the edge of the band

Click here to view
Figure 2: The AS-OCT (anterior segment optical coherence tomography) image showing extension of the band (asterisk) into the corneoscleral limbus

Click here to view



  Discussion Top


Scleral buckling is the oldest and most established method to reattach the retina. Buckle erosion, intrusion, and extrusion are rare, yet significant, complications of the scleral buckling procedure.[1] Anterior migration of the solid silicone encircling buckle element through the insertion of extraocular muscles is a very rare complication. It has been suggested that cheesewiring, which means encircling silicone band eroding through the rectus muscle insertions, which is a slow process with simultaneous spontaneous reattachment of the transected muscle fibers back to the sclera, might be the reason for anterior migration.[2],[3] Migration of silicone band can occur if it is placed anteriorly to the equator, not anchored well to the sclera, if it is too tight, or the scleral flaps are too thin.[3] Extensive cryocoagulation, high myopia, or altered muscles may also contribute to the anterior migration of the band. An alternative explanation could be mistakenly placing the band over the muscle insertion rather than under it; however, in our case, it is unlikely given the expertise of the surgeon.

Very few cases are reported with the scleral band migrating anteriorly and positioning in corneal stroma or limbus.[4],[5] In this photo-essay, we report such a complication; but in our case, we preferred not to remove the band as any attempt to remove it may cause more damage than any benefit. Surgeons should be aware of such a potential complication. The need for intervention should be individualized according to the patient depending on the need for cosmesis, rise in intraocular pressure, or restriction of extraocular movements.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Nguyen QD, Lashkari K, Hirose T, Pruett RC, McMeel JW, Schepens CL. Erosion and intrusion of silicone rubber scleral buckle. Presentation and management. Retina 2001;21:214-20.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Lanigan LP, Wilson-Holt N, Gregor ZJ. Migrating scleral explants. Eye (Lond) 1992;6(Pt 3):317-21.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Maguire AM, Zarbin MA, Eliott D. Migration of solid silicone encircling element through four rectus muscles. Ophthalmic Surg 1993;24:604-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Pearce JL, Roper-Hall MJ. Intracorneal migration of a silicone strap. Br J Ophthalmol 1969;53:553-6.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lopez MA, Mateo C, Corcóstegui I, Corcóstegui B. Transmuscular migration and straddling of the cornea by an encircling buckle. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging 2007;38:402-3.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
Abstract
Discussion
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed64    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded9    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]