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OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16

A rare case of lens neovascularization


1 Department of Orbit, Oculoplastics and Ocular Oncology, Aravind Eye Hospital and PG Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Chief of the Department of Intraocular Lens and Cataract Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and PG Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Paediatric Ophthalmology, Aravind Eye Hospital and PG Institute of Ophthalmology, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication31-Dec-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Meghana Tanwar
Department of Orbit, Oculoplastics and Ocular Oncology, Aravind Eye Hospital and PG Institute of Ophthalmology, Madurai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1620_20

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How to cite this article:
Tanwar M, Shekhar M, Chakrabarty S. A rare case of lens neovascularization. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2021;1:16

How to cite this URL:
Tanwar M, Shekhar M, Chakrabarty S. A rare case of lens neovascularization. Indian J Ophthalmol Case Rep [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Feb 26];1:16. Available from: https://www.ijoreports.in/text.asp?2021/1/1/16/305496



An octogenarian presented to us with defective vision in his right eye for a year with neither a systemic illness nor a history of ocular trauma. The visual acuity in this eye was light perception. Slit-lamp examination revealed a white cataract with patchy capsular calcification and a well-defined subcapsular neovascular frond [Figure 1]. He was planned for cataract extraction in the right eye, but refused surgery and was lost to follow-up.
Figure 1: Anterior segment photograph of the right eye showing a well-defined subcapsular neovascular frond in a hypermature cataract

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Lenticular vascularization is a rare phenomenon which occurs due to traumatic phacolysis, chronic uveitis or severe ocular ischemia.[1],[2],[3] Apart from a surgical lensectomy,[4] anti-VEGF therapies may be useful.[5]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Kabat AG. Lenticular neovascularization subsequent to traumatic cataract formation. Optom Vis Sci 2011;88:1127-32.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Sowka J, Vollmer L, Falco L. Rapid onset phacolysis. Optometry 2004;75:571-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Patel P, Rodman J. Intralenticular neovascularization in a cataractous crystalline lens. Optometry 2012;83:125-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Braganza A, Thomas R, George T, Mermoud A. Management of phacolytic glaucoma: Experience of 135 cases. Indian J Ophthalmol 1998;46:139-43.  Back to cited text no. 4
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5.
Eren E, Küçükerdönmez C, Yilmaz G, Akova YA. Regression of neovascular posterior capsule vessels by intravitreal bevacizumab. J Cataract Refract Surg 2007;33:1113-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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